Custers Last Stand

Bighead, Kate. “An eye for an eye.” pps 1-5. Online. Internet. 5 June 1999. Available:
http://www.stedwards.edu/cfpages/farrall/eye.htm.

The plight of the Native American Indians throughout history is plagued by many battles and
episodes of relocation from one reservation to the next. One would have thought that the Native Americans
were merely puppets that the white man controlled to fit their own needs. However, the battle
known as Custer’s Last Stand was different. It would seem that the Indian had finally gained control of
white man for once by what looked like a victory. Or was it?
As a Native American woman who matured into an adult during these times of battle and unrest,
Kate Bighead recalls the tragedy of Custer’s Last Stand.Her portrayal of Custer leads the reader to think
that he was not only a general sent to fight her people but a likeable man, especially among the women.
Her own cousin, Me-o-tzi, even claimed that Custer was her husband. She turned down others because she
believed that he would return for her eventually. It was a fact that she accompanied him on trips to search
for Indian trails.This image of Custer would prove to be questionable after the battle yet to come.

In June of 1876, as camps of Indians set out to move along the Little Big Horn River in search of
antelope there was no known threat of battle. This would soon change as a warning would spread through
the camps that soldiers were coming. The soldiers were sent in an attempt to round up the Indians and
force them to return to their reservations. However, the tribes fought back to defend themselves from the
guns of the soldiers. Most were armed simply with a bow and arrow and the Everywhere Spirit (a battle
plan in which the Indians crawled along the ground and ended up surrounding the enemy). This would
prove to be beneficial to the Indians defense because they could fire and remain undetected unlike the
Towards the end of this short-lived battle, it is said that the soldiers began to take their own lives
by shooting themselves with their revolvers. Indians conclude that the Everywhere Spirit caused them to
commit suicide by driving them crazy. However some believe that by saving the last bullet for themselves,
they could avoid torture by their enemy if captured. It would almost seem as if the Indians won this battle
with little effort yet the victory was claimed in their favor.
In conclusion, at the end of the battle, few Native Americans had lost their lives. The carnage
mostly consisted of the troops and included their leader, General, George Armstrong Custer. According
to Bighead, the women stopped the men from severing his body parts by conveying to them that he was a
relative out of respect to Me-o-tzi. As a result, they only cut off one finger. This battle would not end the
conflict between the Native American and the white man, it still rages on today in other forms. From court
cases to monetary support from the government, it’s debatable if the Native American will ever feel that the
In my opinion, the Native American Indian has had to endure many hardships in the past at the
hand of the white man. Unfortunately, history cannot be re-written. We can only make things better for
the present and future of the Indian and for society as a whole. As with all battles or wars, there is tragedy
and loss that cannot be replaced and this one was no different. Soldiers were lost as well as great Indian
warriors. I feel that either side would find it hard to claim any gain from this battle but only great loss.

Custer’s Last Stand served as a wake up call to the U.S. government in my opinion. It clearly
conveyed the message that the Indian would fight for their rights and freedoms and not simply comply.
This account of Custer’s Last Stand by Kate Bighead echoes the pain of all Native Americans.
She describes the frustration and survival techniques implemented by the Chiefs as a way of life which is
the true tragedy in it all. The warriors that were lost were her family and friends. She lived this battle and
survived but the pain of loss clearly stayed with her forever.

Bighead, Kate. “An eye for an eye.” pps 1-5. Online. Internet. 5 June 1999. Available:
http://www.stedwards.edu/cfpages/farrall/eye.htm.

The plight of the Native American Indians throughout history is plagued by many battles and
episodes of relocation from one reservation to the next. One would have thought that the Native Americans
were merely puppets that the white man controlled to fit their own needs. However, the battle
known as Custer’s Last Stand was different. It would seem that the Indian had finally gained control of
white man for once by what looked like a victory. Or was it?
As a Native American woman who matured into an adult during these times of battle and unrest,
Kate Bighead recalls the tragedy of Custer’s Last Stand.Her portrayal of Custer leads the reader to think
that he was not only a general sent to fight her people but a likeable man, especially among the women.
Her own cousin, Me-o-tzi, even claimed that Custer was her husband. She turned down others because she
believed that he would return for her eventually. It was a fact that she accompanied him on trips to search
for Indian trails.This image of Custer would prove to be questionable after the battle yet to come.

In June of 1876, as camps of Indians set out to move along the Little Big Horn River in search of
antelope there was no known threat of battle. This would soon change as a warning would spread through
the camps that soldiers were coming. The soldiers were sent in an attempt to round up the Indians and
force them to return to their reservations. However, the tribes fought back to defend themselves from the
guns of the soldiers. Most were armed simply with a bow and arrow and the Everywhere Spirit (a battle
plan in which the Indians crawled along the ground and ended up surrounding the enemy). This would
prove to be beneficial to the Indians defense because they could fire and remain undetected unlike the
Towards the end of this short-lived battle, it is said that the soldiers began to take their own lives
by shooting themselves with their revolvers. Indians conclude that the Everywhere Spirit caused them to
commit suicide by driving them crazy. However some believe that by saving the last bullet for themselves,
they could avoid torture by their enemy if captured. It would almost seem as if the Indians won this battle
with little effort yet the victory was claimed in their favor.
In conclusion, at the end of the battle, few Native Americans had lost their lives. The carnage
mostly consisted of the troops and included their leader, General, George Armstrong Custer. According
to Bighead, the women stopped the men from severing his body parts by conveying to them that he was a
relative out of respect to Me-o-tzi. As a result, they only cut off one finger. This battle would not end the
conflict between the Native American and the white man, it still rages on today in other forms. From court
cases to monetary support from the government, it’s debatable if the Native American will ever feel that the
In my opinion, the Native American Indian has had to endure many hardships in the past at the
hand of the white man. Unfortunately, history cannot be re-written. We can only make things better for
the present and future of the Indian and for society as a whole. As with all battles or wars, there is tragedy
and loss that cannot be replaced and this one was no different. Soldiers were lost as well as great Indian
warriors. I feel that either side would find it hard to claim any gain from this battle but only great loss.

Custer’s Last Stand served as a wake up call to the U.S. government in my opinion. It clearly
conveyed the message that the Indian would fight for their rights and freedoms and not simply comply.
This account of Custer’s Last Stand by Kate Bighead echoes the pain of all Native Americans.
She describes the frustration and survival techniques implemented by the Chiefs as a way of life which is
the true tragedy in it all. The warriors that were lost were her family and friends. She lived this battle and
survived but the pain of loss clearly stayed with her forever.


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